NIKE

ΝΙΚΗ

1. The goddess of victory, or, as the Romans called her, Victoria, is described as a daughter of Pallas and Styx, and as a sister of Zelus (zeal), Cratos (strength), and Bia (force). At the time when Zeus entered upon the fight against the Titans, and called upon the gods for assistance, Nice and her two sisters were the first that came forward, and Zeus was so pleased with their readiness, that he caused them ever after to live with him in Olympus. (Hes. Theog. 382, &c.; Apollod. i. 2. § 2.) Nice had a celebrated temple on the acropolis of Athens, which is still extant and in excellent preservation. (Paus. i. 22. § 4. iii. 15. § 5.) She is often seen represented in ancient works of art, especially together with other divinities, such as Zeus and Athena, and with conquering heroes whose horses she guides. In her appearance she resembles Athena, but has wings, and carries a palm or a wreath, and is engaged in raising a trophy, or in inscribing the victory of the conqueror on a shield. (Paus. v. 10. § 2. 11. §§ 1, 2, .vi. 18. § 1; comp. Hirt, Mythol. Bilderb. p. 93, &c.)

2. A daughter of Thespius and, by Heracles, mother of Nicodromus. (Apollod. ii. 7. § 8.)

3. Nice also occurs as a surname of Athena, under which the goddess had a sanctuary on the acropolis of Megara. (Paus. i. 42. § 4; Eurip. Ion, 1529.)