ANTIOPE

ΑΝΤΙΟΠΗ

Antiope (detail), by Antonio Allegri da Correggio (1489-1534), Italian Renaissance painter

Antiope (detail), by Antonio Allegri da Correggio
(1489-1534), Italian Renaissance painter

1. A daughter of Nycteus and Polyxo (Apollod. iii. 5. § 5, 10. § 1), or of the river god Asopus in Boeotia. (Odyss. xi. 260; Apollon. Rhod. i. 735.) She became by Zeus the mother of Amphion and Zethus. [See AMPHION.] Dionysus threw her into a state of madness on account of the vengeance which her sons had taken on Dirce. In this condition she wandered about through Greece, until Phocus, the grandson of Sisyphus, cured and married her. She was buried with Phocus in one common tomb. (Paus. ix. 17. § 4.)

2. An Amazon, a sister of Hippolyte, who married Theseus. (Paus. i. 2, § 1, 41. § 7.) According to Servius (ad Aen. xi. 661), she was a daughter of Hippolyte. Diodorus (iv. 16) states, that Theseus received her as a present from Heracles. When subsequently Attica was invaded by the Amazons, Antiope fought with Theseus against them, and died the death of a heroine by his side. (Comp. Diod. iv. 28; Plut. Thes. 26, 27.) According to Hyginus (Fab. 241) Antiope was a daughter of Ares, and was killed by Theseus himself in consequence of an oracle.

3. A daughter of Pylon or Pylaon, was married to Eurytus, by whom she became the mother of the Argonauts Iphitus and Clytius. She is also called Antioche. (Apollon. Rhod. i. 86; Hygin. Fab. 14, with Muncker's note.)

4. A daughter of Aeolus, by whom Poseidon begot Boeotus and Hellen. (Hygin. Fab. 157 ; Diod. iv. 67, who calls the mother of these two heroes Arne.) [AEOLUS.]

5. Two other mythical personages of this name occur in Apollod. ii. 7. § 8, and in Serv. ad Aen. vi. 46, though Servius seems to confound Antiope with Anteia, the wife of Proetus. [See PIERUS, No. 2.]

Antiope and the Satyr, by Sebastiano Ricci (1659-1734), Italian Rococo painter

Antiope and the Satyr, by Sebastiano Ricci (1659-1734), Italian Rococo painter